.init and .end for the same original letter

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jkmogford
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2018 12:41 am

.init and .end for the same original letter

Post by jkmogford » Sat Sep 08, 2018 12:57 am

In a course I'm taking we were taught how to create .init and .end and they are placed in the SingleSubstitution2 table under AccessAllAlternates1. When I test the font in font creator, word and adobe, it appears that the .init takes precedence and will show up at the beginning and the end of a word. Example: I tried to make r.init and r.end and when typing the word river, I get the r.init at the beginning and the end. It's as if the programs can't tell the difference. So for the time being I've removed "duplicate" letters to .ss01 - and I have created the chaining context for each of the two (r.init and r.end) but that didn't seem to make a difference.

I have a feeling there is a way to make both work, but maybe it wasn't covered in the class because her examples didn't show this. Only that if you had for example a script connecting g and a script g that loops below the next letter, then you would make that g, and any additional g's a stylistic alternate.

If there isn't a way for this option to work, I would like to ask for this to be an enhancement. I know some designers make multiple stylistic alternate sets for their fonts, however, mine isn't as complicated as that.

Thanks in advance for any advice / tips you can provide.
Julie :)

Erwin Denissen
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Re: .init and .end for the same original letter

Post by Erwin Denissen » Sat Sep 08, 2018 11:28 am

The forum already has some great resources that should help you out. For example:

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=5804#p26497

We might isolate the best parts of these posts and make it a separate "tutorial" so it will become a lot easier to understand and use such OpenType layout features for script fonts.
Erwin Denissen
High-Logic
Proven Font Technology

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