Lettering on a bronze statue

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William
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Lettering on a bronze statue

Postby William » Fri Nov 14, 2008 8:45 am

A detail of some lettering from a photograph of a bronze statue.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/l ... detail.jpg

William Overington

14 November 2008

----

Supplementary note of 6 February 2015.

The website shown in the picture no longer goes to the artist's webspace, yet the link http://www.a4a.co.uk does so.

viewtopic.php?p=24409#p24409

William
Last edited by William on Fri Feb 06, 2015 12:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby William » Fri Nov 14, 2008 7:44 pm

Here are links to two pictures of the statue.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/statue_view_1.jpg

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/statue_view_2.jpg

The top of the statue is somewhat over two metres above ground level.

William Overington

14 November 2008

Dick Pape
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Postby Dick Pape » Fri Nov 14, 2008 8:02 pm

Surprised it's a recent art piece.

http://www.a4a.com/bronzesculpturep.html

(Should have figured that out from the internet web site on the base ...)

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Postby William » Sat Nov 15, 2008 7:47 am

Thanks Dick for your interest.

I posted the first picture in the hope that some readers would use the web address to look for more information.

I find it quite fascinating where web addresses appear these days.

[Supplementary note of 9 October 2010 about the next paragraph.

Subsequent developments mean that the search suggested in the next paragraph may not now yield the results so easily. I am hoping to add an explanatory post later today in this thread so as not to spoil the search fun suggested in the next paragraph. So readers trying the search may prefer to search for 60163 grey and 60163 2008 instead, but I cannot quite get the answer using that at present, so maybe the post that I hope to post later will be a better route.

End of supplementary note about the next paragraph]

Another web address which might perhaps be of interest can be found by going to http://www.youtube.com and searching for 60163 and then looking for a web address displayed in a prominent place on an object shown in a video.

I know that finding the web addresses in pictures on the internet is not the same as finding them directly on the objects in real life, though perhaps some of the amazement still gets through.

I remember when the web first got popular in the world at large in the mid-1990s that vans with web addresses would state that the web address was a web address. Then fairly quickly the stating that a web address was a web address got dropped and now just the main part without the http:// part at the start gets used, presumably with the presumption that people will know that it is a web address.

Having seen the lettering on the Eof statue I began to think of whether there could be a sculpture of an early printing press made of bronze, perhaps with the vertical posts made as if a sketch using square-sectioned bronze rod of about 25mm sides to denote the side edges and the top edges of the posts: this in order both to keep the cost down and to make a design centred on the lettering.

Then the bed of the press could have type, say 72 point or maybe larger, cast in bronze with tangs on the base so that they could not be removed from the sculpture, yet could be moved about using slot-ways in the base of the type bed, one "north-south" slot with several "east-west" slots running to one side from the "north-south" slot and a slot from the other side of the "north-south" slot leading to a typecase area.

This would mean that short items of text could be set in the type bed.

The type could then be photographed and possibly brass-rubbed as well so as to produce permanent images.

The bronze font would need to be produced and so maybe only capitals would be produced with more A's than Z's as in a traditional metal card fount, though hopefully two ampersands would be included.

The design of the sculpture and the design and manufacture of the font could be interesting. As well as letters there would need to be spacing and some punctuation, including what are sometimes referred to as smart quotes in electronic fonts.

Maybe the sculpture could be placed in the garden of a Museum of Renaissance Printing.

William Overington

15 November 2008
Last edited by William on Sat Oct 09, 2010 8:40 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby William » Sat Nov 15, 2008 9:05 am

William wrote:Then the bed of the press could have type, say 72 point or maybe larger, cast in bronze with tangs on the base so that they could not be removed from the sculpture, yet could be moved about using slot-ways in the base of the type bed, one "north-south" slot with several "east-west" slots running to one side from the "north-south" slot and a slot from the other side of the "north-south" slot leading to a typecase area.


Thinking further about this, if the type looks much like traditional metal printing type in that the letters on the type are mirror images of the letters as they appear on a printed page, then, if "north" is the top of the printed page, then the several "east-west" slots running to one side from the "north-south" slot would go eastward from the "north-south" slot so that each of those "east-west" slots could be used as similar to a composing stick with the first letter of a word being first into the eastward-going slot.

The slot from the other side of the "north-south" slot leading to a typecase area would thus go westward from the "north-south" slot.

If the resulting display of set type were just to be displayed for observation or to be photographed then the type would not need to be held so firmly as if brass-rubbing-style images were to be produced.

William Overington

15 November 2008

William
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Re: Lettering on a bronze statue

Postby William » Thu Mar 11, 2010 9:07 am

William wrote:A detail of some lettering from a photograph of a bronze statue.


Here is a link to a Google street view image showing the statue.

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=52.0 ... .68,,0,2.1

The statute is also displayed in a few nearby images as well.

William Overington

11 March 2010

William
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Re:

Postby William » Sat Oct 09, 2010 9:01 am

William wrote:
I find it quite fascinating where web addresses appear these days.

[Supplementary note of 9 October 2010 about the next paragraph.

Subsequent developments mean that the search suggested in the next paragraph may not now yield the results so easily. I am hoping to add an explanatory post later today in this thread so as not to spoil the search fun suggested in the next paragraph. So readers trying the search may prefer to search for 60163 grey and 60163 2008 instead, but I cannot quite get the answer using that at present, so maybe the post that I hope to post later will be a better route.

End of supplementary note about the next paragraph]

Another web address which might perhaps be of interest can be found by going to http://www.youtube.com and searching for 60163 and then looking for a web address displayed in a prominent place on an object shown in a video.



The web address being searched for is http://www.a1steam.com although the http:// part is not on the object and the letters were in capitals. The object is a steam locomotive, number 60163, newly built, when still under test, before the nameplates were added. At that time the locomotive was liveried in grey with the letters in the web address in capitals on the side of the tender in white.

The videos from that time may well still be on the web, yet are amongst a large number of later videos of number 60163 liveried in apple green.

Although way off-topic, some readers might nevertheless like the following related link.

http://www.a1steam.com/index.php?option ... Itemid=123

William Overington

9 October 2010

William
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Re: Lettering on a bronze statue

Postby William » Fri Jun 17, 2011 7:26 am

I noticed that the following web page is now available.

http://www.a4a.com/Evesham.html

William Overington

17 June 2011

William
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Re: Lettering on a bronze statue

Postby William » Fri Feb 06, 2015 12:41 pm

I tried the web address that is on the statue, shown in the first post in this thread, and it now goes to information about cars.

However, http://www.a4a.co.uk does go to the artist's webspace.

William Overington

6 February 2015


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