Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

A central location highlighting fonts created with FontCreator and/or Scanahand. Post information about your fonts here.
William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Fri Feb 05, 2010 9:09 am

I have now prepared a Unicode Text Document that contains the poem from earlier in this thread encoded using the symbols.

One way to display the contents is to download the file to local storage, open it in Microsoft WordPad as a Unicode Text Document and then format it using either the Localizable Sentences 008 font or using the Localizable Sentences 007 font as the fonts are the same for the characters used in the poem. I used 24 point at first. I also tried 12 point and the display is good and, on this PC, just fits in the display panel so that all of the poem is displayed at once: that effect was unexpected, yet welcome.

Here is the file.
poem_001.txt
A poem using localizable sentences
(150 Bytes) Downloaded 375 times
William Overington

5 February 2010

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Fri Feb 05, 2010 10:28 am

I have now written another poem using some of the localizable sentences.

I composed this poem in my mind, in English, as I went along, yet I put it into a WordPad file directly using the plane 15 glyphs that are used to represent the whole sentences, not actually writing down the English version.

I then saved the document as a Unicode Text Document.

One way to display the contents is to download the file to local storage, open it in Microsoft WordPad as a Unicode Text Document and then format it using the Localizable Sentences 008 font.

The display produced is language independent.

Hopefully this poem expresses imagery.

How well would the poem localize into each of a number of natural languages?

Please note that this poem uses one localizable sentence on each line. That is because that is the structure of the poem. If the localizable sentences are used in prose then they would not necessarily, nor usually, be set as one localizable sentence on each line. Also, depending upon the structure of a particular poem, the localizable sentences do not necessarily need to be one localizable sentence on each line.
poem_002.txt
A poem using localizable sentences
(130 Bytes) Downloaded 375 times
William Overington

5 February 2010

honest.bern
Posts: 39
Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 8:28 am
Location: England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by honest.bern » Fri Feb 05, 2010 10:15 pm

My contribution to the use of “blue”.

I am learning Polish and Italian. Both my teachers have explained that in those languages there is no word corresponding to all the meanings of “blue”.

In Polish “niebieski” means “light blue”, “granatowy” means “dark blue”.

In Italian “azzurro” means “light blue”, “blu” means “dark blue”.

Azzurro does not include blu.
Blu does not include azzurro.
Niebieski does not include granatowy.
Granatowy does not include niebieski.

Honest Bern

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Sat Feb 06, 2010 11:34 am

Thank you for your post.

As a result I have produced three image files using Microsoft Paint.

These are each 100 pixels by 100 pixels and are each saved as a .png file.
blue_0_0_255.png
blue_0_0_255.png
blue_0_0_255.png (564 Bytes) Viewed 15291 times
blue_192_224_255.png
blue_192_224_255.png
blue_192_224_255.png (365 Bytes) Viewed 15291 times
blue_0_0_64.png
blue_0_0_64.png
blue_0_0_64.png (508 Bytes) Viewed 15291 times
If asked, in an everyday usage context here in England, to characterize the colour blue, I would think of the top colour in this display.

If asked, in an everyday usage context here in England, to characterize the three colours in this display, I would think of the top colour as Royal Blue, the middle colour as Sky Blue and the bottom colour as Navy Blue.

In colour descriptions in clothes catalogues and the like, the colour Royal Blue is often denoted simply as Royal.

However, that is in an everyday usage context. In precision measurement of colour, those names may have meanings that are different from the colours shown here. However, the localizable sentences would often be being used in an everyday context.

Of the three colours displayed, the top colour is because that is the total blue of the (red, green, blue) system on many computers. The other two colours have (red, green, blue) values chosen by me simply to try to convey the meaning that I have tried to express in this post: so the choices of the (red, green, blue) values of those two colours is just my idea expressed in this post, they are not based on a standard or anything like that.

Maybe I need to define some more localizable sentences for colours?

William Overington

6 February 2010

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Sat Feb 06, 2010 2:58 pm

I have now produced the Localizable Sentences 009 font.

I started a palette of additional colours at Alt 1020181. That corresponds to U+F9115.

Add a cell at U+F9115.

U+F9115 LOCALIZABLE SENTENCE THE COLOUR IS SKY BLUE.
Centred on (r, g, b) of (192, 224, 255).

Here is the font.
LOCSE009.TTF
Localizable Sentences 009 font
(35.57 KiB) Downloaded 344 times
William Overington

6 February 2010

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Mon Feb 08, 2010 8:06 am

Some readers might like to know of my post in the comments section of an Adobe blog.

http://blogs.adobe.com/jnack/2010/02/ip ... plate.html

The post is about the possibility of implementing iPhone and iPad apps using the localizable sentences.

William Overington

8 February 2010

Supplementary note of Monday 6 December 2010

The link has changed.

It is now as follows.

http://blogs.adobe.com/jnack/2010/02/ip ... omorr.html

William Overington

6 December 2010
Last edited by William on Mon Dec 06, 2010 9:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Mon Feb 08, 2010 8:30 am

Here is a poem that I have written. It includes the new sentence.

U+F9115 LOCALIZABLE SENTENCE THE COLOUR IS SKY BLUE.

It is summer.
It is sunny.
The colour is sky blue.
It is summer.
It is raining.
It is summer.
It is sunny.
The colour is red.
The colour is orange.
The colour is yellow.
The colour is green.
The colour is blue.
The colour is magenta.
It is summer.
It is sunny.
The colour is sky blue.

The poem is also available as a sequence of the Private Use Area codes, together with some line break characters, in the attachment to this post.

In order to display the language-independent glyphs for them all one needs to have the Localizable Sentences 009 font installed.
poem_003.txt
A poem using localizable sentences
(130 Bytes) Downloaded 363 times
William Overington

8 February 2010

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Wed Feb 10, 2010 9:13 am

I like to think of the system that would localize from localizable sentence characters into text in a natural language as in some ways like a font.

A character would be provided as input to the localization database and a complete sentence would be returned.

This is analogous to how a font works in that with a font a character is provided as input to the font and a glyph is returned.

Suppose now that the idea of glyph substitution that is in OpenType fonts were applied to the localization database.

For frequently used sequences of two localizable sentences there could be a mechanism similar to the glyph substitution mechanism of a font in that instead of two independent localized sentences, there would be one localized sentence supplied.

Suppose that there were two localizable sentences, as follows.

There is a flower.
The colour is yellow.

This conveys the meaning that there is a yellow flower.

However, if a localization system were set up so that that particular sequence of two sentences were replaced by one localized sentence, then the output could be as follows.

There is a yellow flower.

This would not be done by trying to extract the word yellow from one sentence and placing it before the word flower in the other sentence as that could lead to great problems.

For example, in English, that approach would not work for the following sequence.

There is a flower.
The colour is orange.

The desired effect would be as follows.

There is an orange flower.

The word an being used instead of the word a because the word orange starts with a vowel.

However, encoding of some specific pairs could be useful, as an end user selectable option.

There would not be Unicode defined code points for the substituted combined sentences, transmission of messages from one place to another would use only the basic sentences.

Certainly, if 500 localizable sentences were implemented then if every ordered pair of sentences could be substituted in this way that would need 250,000 extra sentences and that would not only be impractical but also problem causing and is not being suggested.

Only a relatively small number of such substitutions would be used, just as one only glyph substitutes a relatively small number of ligature pairs in an OpenType font.

In some cases, such as localizing poetry that has been written using localizable sentences, maybe such substitutions would not be desirable, yet maybe for some applications of localizable sentences it could perhaps be a useful technique worth considering.

Whether the technique is useful or not, hopefully it is an interesting matter for thought.

William Overington

10 February 2010

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Thu Jun 02, 2011 11:18 am

Please may I cross-reference the following thread in the support forum.

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=3448

William Overington

2 June 2011

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Thu Jun 02, 2011 11:41 am

I found that I would like to have a font that also allows access to the glyphs for the localizable sentences from the plane 0 Private Use Area. This is partly so that I can produce a pdf document using Serif PagePlus X3, (which is not the latest version of PagePlus) that does not access glyphs from plane 15 and partly because it may have been a step too far all at once to start with using plane 15 for experiments.

I have now produced the Localizable Sentences 010 font in file named LOCSE010.TTF.

This file adds copies of the glyphs of the 65 symbols thus far in use, mapping them into plane 0.

The mapping structure is to map a glyph originally mapped as U+F9xyz as U+Exyz, where each of x, y, z is here used to represent any chosen hexadecimal character.
For examples, the glyph mapped as U+F900E is now also mapped as U+E00E and the glyph mapped as U+F9022 is now also mapped as U+E022.

I have tested the font using Serif PagePlus X3 using Insert Symbol Other... and achieved good results. I found that using the Show Large Characters option within the Insert Symbol Other... facility was helpful.

Here is the font.
LOCSE010.TTF
Localizable Sentences 010 font
(53.5 KiB) Downloaded 309 times

Hopefully the new mappings and the availability of this font will lead to more experimentation.

William Overington

2 June 2011

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Fri Jun 03, 2011 11:10 am

I have used the Localizable Sentences 010 font to produce the following pdf.
locse010.pdf
The sixty-five mapped symbol glyphs of the Localizable Sentences 010 font and localizations into English en-gb-oed text.
(15.9 KiB) Downloaded 296 times

I have found that a convenient way to think of the set of localizable sentences encoded as Unicode characters is as if they were elements of a constructed language, Language Y, a language that has no individual words only sentences and digits and a few phrases such as "Best regards," that are followed by a name. Thinking of the set as elements of Language Y means that the private use language tag x-y can be used to refer to a string of one or more characters of Language Y, thus opening the possibility that XML (eXtensible Markup Language) language tool technologies can be used in constructing translation and localization dictionaries. For example, hopefully the information in the pdf could be used to construct XML-based language tool technology files using the x-y language tag and the en-gb-oed language tag.

William Overington

3 June 2011

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Fri Jun 03, 2011 3:38 pm

Here is a pdf that I have produced.
locse010_art.pdf
A picture made while trying out the clipart within Serif DrawPlus X4 is applied to trying out the Localizable Sentences 010 font.
(15.41 KiB) Downloaded 294 times
William Overington

3 June 2011

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:43 pm

Before clicking the link to the .swf file in this post, readers are advised to read the following post.

viewtopic.php?p=14973#p14973

I have now produced a Flash .swf file, an animation made using Serif DrawPlus X4 and my Localizable Sentences 010 font. It is not interactive, it just builds up a message, in fact the same message that is shown in a still image in the fifth post in this Gallery thread entitled Localizable Sentences Experiment font support.

Before posting the following link here, I emailed a copy of the .swf file from one email address at btinternet.com to another email at btinternet.com and then used the virus checking software of the webmail and that reported as follows.

No virus threat detected

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/c ... on_001.swf

The ftp program that I used to upload the file to our family webspace informs that the file is 10423 bytes.

William Overington

7 June 2011

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Fri Jun 10, 2011 10:15 am

I am now researching on the adding of some additional sentences to the set; sentences that I hope will be of practical use in real world situations.

The idea is that the system could be of use to people trying to find out information concerning family and friends who may have been involved in a disaster in another country, in those situations where communication through the language barrier is needed.

Example of use, the messages being here expressed as localized to English.

In transmission, each of the localizable sentences would be transmitted as one Unicode character. The names of the people and the email address would be transmitted as plain text as shown in the examples and would not be localized.

Enquiry email.

----

Is there any information about the following person please?
Margaret Gattenford
The person is female.
The name of the enquirer is as follows.
Albert Johnson
The email address of the enquirer is as follows.
albert@example.com
The enquirer is the brother of the first person that was named.

----

Reply email.

----

The following question has been asked.
Is there any information about the following person please?
Margaret Gattenford
My answer is as follows.
The person is safe.

----

The communication uses eight localizable sentences, one of them twice. Two of the sentences are from the existing set; the other six are new.

Although six new localizable sentences are used in the above example emails, they are six from a larger set of new sentences, which set is not yet finalized, being designed to cover various situations. There is a balance between comprehensiveness of meaning conveying and keeping the number of sentences as small as is reasonable.

I hope that the idea is of interest.

William Overington

10 June 2011

William
Top Typographer
Top Typographer
Posts: 1997
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 6:41 pm
Location: Worcestershire, England
Contact:

Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Mon Jun 13, 2011 10:34 am

The process of designing a collection of sentences and symbols to represent them is interesting.

I have produced a font in order to be able to test some of the designs. The font is not published as the glyphs have just been placed more or less arbitrarily in the plane 0 Private Use Area as a temporary measure as I continue to research which sentences to include in the collection and to design glyphs for them.

Here is a graphic. It is for the following sentence.

The person.is female.
example001.png
Glyph design for the sentence The person is female.
example001.png (3.87 KiB) Viewed 13625 times

The design has the following features.

1. As with all of the symbols for the set of localizable sentences it is of size 23 blocks wide by 7 blocks high, in the lower left corner of a space 24 blocks wide by 8 blocks high. Each block is 256 font units square.

2. The 23 blocks width is considered as divided up as 7+1+7+1+7.

3. The symbol in the leftmost area is specific to localizable sentences referring to a person who may be involved in a disaster. There is another design for localizable sentences about the enquirer.

4. The line along the top is, in the symbol for this particular sentence, used just to show that the various parts of the glyph are all part of the same glyph.

5. The circle in the centre refers to person.

6. The lozenge at the right refers to female. The lozenge is chosen based on the fact that in heraldry the armorial bearings of a lady are depicted on a lozenge. For the avoidance of doubt, in this system of symbols for localizable sentences, male is represented using a square.

William Overington

13 June 2011

Post Reply