Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

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William
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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Sat Feb 22, 2014 9:21 am

Reference:

viewtopic.php?f=8&t=4825

William Overington

22 February 2014

William
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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Sat Sep 05, 2015 8:45 am

It is now 9:29 am United Kingdom time as I write.

This morning I have tried making a font for the first time since I got my new laptop computer, running Windows 8, following the break down of the Windows xp computer that had served well for many years.

This went very well.

Here are the notes that I made as I went along.

====

Saturday 5 September 2015

This is the producing of a font relating to the following Unicode mailing list forum post.

http://unicode.org/mail-arch/unicode-ml ... /0204.html

8:11 am

Experimental font LOCSE701.TTF

Start by opening LOCSE034.TTF

Save as a new project LOCSE701

Except for the two localizable sentence markup bubble brackets and the associated digits, remove the Private Use Area glyphs as this is just to be a minimum font for the purpose.

Rename the font as Localizable Sentences 701 and set export names as LOCSE701

Insert code points for U+EE30..U+EE39 and for U+EFFF.

The code for the Insert characters facility is

$EE30-$EE39,$EFFF

Copy just the glyphs of the digits still in the Private Use Area to U+EE30..U+EE39.

Delete the originals.

Adapt and combine the glyphs of the two localizable sentence markup bubble brackets to produce a glyph for the base character.

Delete the originals.

The glyphs for the base character and the digits will only show when there is no automated localization in action.

Now, as these are experimental glyphs in a Private Use Area, add an E below the base line so that if the base glyph is ever encoded into regular Unicode there will be no confusion.

Validate the font.

Test the font using the preview panel.

Export the font.

8:56 am

----

8:59 am

Change version string to show the date as I like it, day month year style.

Export the font.

Close the project file.

9:06 am.

Open the font.

Install the font.

Test the font using PagePlus X7.

====

Here are graphics exported from PagePlus X7.
LOCSE701_example_10001.png
LOCSE701_example_10001.png (5.66 KiB) Viewed 3171 times
LOCSE701_example_10014.png
LOCSE701_example_10014.png (5.66 KiB) Viewed 3171 times
Here is the font.
LOCSE701.TTF
(12.51 KiB) Downloaded 70 times
William Overington

5 September 2015
Last edited by William on Sat Sep 05, 2015 4:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

William
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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Sat Sep 05, 2015 10:44 am

Readers who would like to try the font yet who do not have any software that has an Insert Symbol facility may find the following useful.

I have typeset the eleven characters from the plane 0 Private Use Area within Serif PagePlus X7 and I have produced eleven lines of text, each of which consists of a note of the Unicode code point that I have used for the character together with the character itself between two = signs.

This use of the = signs is because in some browsers the characters may be shown as a black rectangle, or as a black square with the hexadecimal code within it, or just show nothing, just leaving what looks like a space.

The = signs will hopefully be useful guides if, for example, trying to copy from a web page and paste into WordPad.

To display the glyphs in WordPad the font would need to be installed, perhaps only temporarily, and then the characters formatted using the font. It is sometimes necessary to only open the application program once the font has been installed.

Anyway, in the hope that they will be useful, here are the eleven lines of text.

U+EE30==

U+EE31==

U+EE32==

U+EE33==

U+EE34==

U+EE35==

U+EE36==

U+EE37==

U+EE38==

U+EE39==

U+EFFF==

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask.

William

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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Sat Sep 05, 2015 6:21 pm

Please know that I have now added an additional page to our family webspace.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/locsetag.htm

It is a web page about one possible way of encoding localizable sentences: each localizable sentence encoded using a base character followed by a sequence of tag characters, the same base character for each encoded localizable sentence.

The page has transcripts of the two previous posts of this thread, listed after transcripts, in chronological order, of my two posts to the Unicode mailing list about the possibility of encoding a localizable sentence using a base character followed by a sequence of tag characters.

The page is linked from the following web page.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/library.htm

William

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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Mon Oct 05, 2015 2:24 pm

Some readers might enjoy the following.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/locse801.htm

William Overington

5 October 2015

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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Wed Oct 07, 2015 7:47 am

Here is a font with LOCSE702.TTF as the file name and Localizable Sentences 702 as the font name.
LOCSE702.TTF
(12.63 KiB) Downloaded 46 times
The font is based on the Localizable Sentences 701 font and adds an experimental glyph for PANLEX BASE CHARACTER at U+EF70 for concept proving experiments.

The glyph design for this Private Use Area mapping has an E below it so as to seek to avoid confusion in case the glyph itself ever becomes encoded into regular Unicode.

The character is at U+EF70 for which the Alt code is Alt 61296 in case readers would like to use that entry method in the WordPad program.

The character is available to be copied onto the clipboard of a PC from between the equals signs in the following line.

U+EF70==

William Overington

7 October 2015

William
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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Thu Oct 08, 2015 6:17 am

Here is a pdf document that I produced yesterday.
two_tagspaces.pdf
(53.82 KiB) Downloaded 95 times
William Overington

8 October 2015

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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Wed Oct 21, 2015 8:04 am

Here is a document that I produced on Monday 19 October 2015
William Overington

21 October 2015

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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Wed Jan 13, 2016 4:53 pm

Recently I tried an experiment learning about using tag characters on a web page.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/tagtests.htm

There is a link on that web page to a font that I produced in 2009 that has visible glyphs for the tag characters.

At that time the tag characters had been deprecated in Unicode, yet most of them are now no longer deprecated.

Two files (namely tagtests.htm and a pdf linked from within tagtests.htm) are linked directly from the following web page, the links are currently at the lower end of the page.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/library.htm

An interesting note is that I found the font file from a post in this forum.

viewtopic.php?p=10587#p10587

I remembered that I had made a font with tag characters in it but I did not remember why I had made it.

I downloaded the font file from this forum, tested it, installed it on my computer and then uploaded it to my family webspace.

In the event, although I am now using tag characters for a different purpose than the purpose for which I made the font, the font, unaltered, has now been of great usefulness to me in my research.

William Overington

13 January 2016

William
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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Sat Feb 06, 2016 12:42 pm

This morning I tried a further experiment.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/tagtests2.htm

The experiment is inspired by the following document.

http://www.unicode.org/L2/L2016/16008r3 ... -emoji.pdf

William Overington

6 February 2016

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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Mon Feb 08, 2016 9:55 am

The following thread is of interest in relation to the previous post in this thread.

viewtopic.php?f=8&t=5994

The thread is entitled

Finding the code point of a character

and it references the above post in this thread.

William Overington

8 February 2016

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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Wed Mar 02, 2016 11:16 am

An everyday analogy to compare and contrast methods of communication of meaning through the language barrier.

I am trying to develop an everyday analogy so as to compare and contrast methods of communication of meaning through the language barrier.

I am considering the following four methods at present:

by using human translation by a translation expert,

by human translation by someone with general education level knowledge of translation,

by machine translation,

by localizable sentences.

----

I am thinking of an analogy of moving freight by road or by rail.

Human translation by an expert would be analogueized as a dedicated door to door lorry service.

Localizable sentences would be analogueized as railway transport.

----

I write to seek views please as to whether that analogy helps convey what I am trying to achieve with localizable sentence technology.

----

I would expect to add details of the relative advantages and disadvantages of each of the options in various situations, including such factors as:

the accuracy in conveying meaning,

the financial cost of conveying meaning,

the timeliness of conveying meaning,

the readily-availableness of conveying meaning.

----

However, for the moment, I seek views of how the analogy appears to work or not work please.

William Overington

2 March 2016

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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by Alfred » Wed Mar 02, 2016 5:15 pm

William wrote:analogueized as
Does that mean the same as "analogous to", or is there a subtle difference? :?
William wrote:readily-availableness
I presume you mean "ready availability". :wink:
William wrote:However, for the moment, I seek views of how the analogy appears to work or not work please.
I'm sorry to say that it doesn't work for me. :(

BTW, William, your posts would be easier to read if you were to avail yourself of the markup features provided here. For example, you wrote:
William wrote:I am considering the following four methods at present:

by using human translation by a translation expert,

by human translation by someone with general education level knowledge of translation,

by machine translation,

by localizable sentences.
Perhaps it's just me, but I think it 's clearer when formatted as follows:
I am considering the following four methods at present:
  • human translation by a translation expert;
  • human translation by someone with general education level knowledge of translation;
  • machine translation;
  • localizable sentences.
FC11.0 Pro (Help) + MT7.0 (Help) • Windows 10

William
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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Thu Mar 03, 2016 9:08 am

Thank you for replying. This is very helpful.
Alfred wrote:
William wrote:analogueized as
Does that mean the same as "analogous to", or is there a subtle difference? :?
So my original and the new version would be as follows.

Localizable sentences would be analogueized as railway transport.

Localizable sentences would be analogous to railway transport.

Are those the same?

I had not thought of that when I wrote the sentence.

Firstly, I did at the time wonder if there is an existing word analogueized yet thought that it conveyed what I was trying to say, so I used it.

I should have checked the dictionary at the time!

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/spell ... alogueized

So that is not listed as such.

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/defin ... h/analogue

Well, I am unable to quite explain why at the moment, yet I do think that there is a subtle difference, in that "analogous to", to me, perhaps implies a two-way analogous relationship, and "analogueized as" implies a one-way only relationship.

For example, one could have the voltage in a particular resistor and capacitor network as analogous to the temperature in a physical object, such as a brick.

So that if one raises the voltage at the edge of the network, that is analogous to the temperature of the outside of the brick being heated. For example, as sunshine falls onto the brick in the morning.

One can then measure the way that the voltage somewhere else in the resistor and capacitor network varies with time and relate that to how the temperature at some known point within the brick varies with time.

The simulation need not be in real time: for example, maybe the simulation runs at a thousand times faster than the heating of the brick.

Having established the basic calibration of the analogy, bigger simulations can then be performed, such as cycling the brick through the outside temperatures of a year's weather.

There is a lot more to it than that, but just mentioned so as to give an idea of the distinction of meaning that I am perhaps sensing.

Whereas with "analogueized as" there is not such a detailed correspondence and maybe only to a subset rather than to the whole thing.

I was trying to get at the concept that localizable sentences could in some circumstances be very convenient for localization of the meaning that one wishes to convey, though only where there is a pre-planned existing collection of sentences for a particular purpose, such as, for example, talking about the weather; for example, seeking information about relatives and friends after a disaster; just as railway transport can be very convenient if there is already track laid to where one wants to go. So sending a large quantity of something to London from a town that is on the railway could be very convenient, yet some other transportation needs would just not be possible using the railway system.
Alfred wrote:
William wrote:readily-availableness
I presume you mean "ready availability". :wink:
Yes, you are correct. Oops.

Thank you.
Alfred wrote:
William wrote:However, for the moment, I seek views of how the analogy appears to work or not work please.
I'm sorry to say that it doesn't work for me. :(
Thank you for your comment.

That is very helpful.

I was thinking of using the analogy in a presentation about standardization to try to convey why I feel that localizable sentence technology would be useful. If it does not work, then it is best not used.
Alfred wrote:
William wrote: BTW, William, your posts would be easier to read if you were to avail yourself of the markup features provided here. For example, you wrote:
William wrote:I am considering the following four methods at present:

by using human translation by a translation expert,

by human translation by someone with general education level knowledge of translation,

by machine translation,

by localizable sentences.
Perhaps it's just me, but I think it 's clearer when formatted as follows:
I am considering the following four methods at present:
  • human translation by a translation expert;
  • human translation by someone with general education level knowledge of translation;
  • machine translation;
  • localizable sentences.
Yes, that is a good idea. Thank you.

William

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Re: Localizable Sentences Experiment font support

Post by William » Wed Apr 27, 2016 8:18 am

I am researching on trying to produce a mathematical model of the language barrier.

This is part of my research on communication through the language barrier using a collection of whole sentences each encoded as a Unicode character.

Here is a link to my research notes page.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/l ... arrier.htm

The page is linked from the following page.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/library.htm

In the http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ngo/l ... arrier.htm page,

> I have produced various document elsewhere in relation to the invention itself.

Many of those documents are available from links in the library.htm page mentioned above.

William Overington

Wednesday 27 April 2016

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