Converting Created Font to Curve

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DAquilina
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Converting Created Font to Curve

Post by DAquilina » Tue Nov 09, 2010 5:19 pm

I have created a custom font for my cartoon strip book and sent the book to the printers. The printer tested some pages and sent me this error message: "We found a problem with your test file. The black text is part of the images and supplied test files are RGB. Could you convert the text to curve and supply new files for test?"

Please help. I don't know how to "convert text to curve." I am under a real time deadline. Any assistance or advice is greatly appreciated. Thank you. Drew

Bhikkhu Pesala
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Re: Converting Created Font to Curve

Post by Bhikkhu Pesala » Wed Nov 10, 2010 8:16 am

This question is not related to FontCreator. Whatever application you used the font in may have an option to convert the text to curves. I know this is straightforward in Serif™ PagePlus, but I don't know about other applications, e.g. if you created the document in Word you will have to ask on an appropriate forum.
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Dave Crosby
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Re: Converting Created Font to Curve

Post by Dave Crosby » Thu Nov 11, 2010 1:25 pm

This can be done with CorelDraw, Inkscape, Gimp, etc.
It would probably be best to make the image and save it as a jpg.
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Fonterific
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Re: Converting Created Font to Curve

Post by Fonterific » Thu Nov 18, 2010 4:07 pm

Dave Crosby wrote:This can be done with CorelDraw, Inkscape, Gimp, etc.
It would probably be best to make the image and save it as a jpg.
I agree with Dave! While in college, it was made very clear that images that were to be printed had to be converted into a jpeg file. If not a jpeg, the photoshop/illustrator/corel file's layers absolutely had to be merged. By keeping the layers separate, the application will view layers/elements as different images and it becomes more of an "image on top of an image" as opposed to one solid if that makes any sort of sense. Not only that, compressing the image's layers or converting it to a jpeg makes the file significantly smaller and therefore makes way for faster printing! Hope this helps! :)

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