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Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Thu Sep 11, 2014 7:01 pm
by Erwin Denissen
That sounds plausible.

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Thu Sep 11, 2014 8:14 pm
by Bhikkhu Pesala
How about using GSUB features that are enabled by default (contextual or standard ligatures) to replace rude words with emoticons? :D

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Sat Sep 13, 2014 4:20 pm
by Bhikkhu Pesala
I just added some glyph substitutions to my Ornaments feature. This feature replace A-Z, a-z, and 0-9 with Dingbats.

Now it will also replace the following with chess pieces.

wk, wq, wr, wb, wn, wp, bk, bq, br, bb, bn bp. >> ♔♕♖♗♘♙♚♛♜♝♞♟
lookup Ornaments {
sub w k -> uni2654;
sub w q -> uni2655;
sub w r -> uni2656;
sub w b -> uni2657;
sub w n -> uni2658;
sub w p -> uni2659;
sub b k -> uni265A;
sub b q -> uni265B;
sub b r -> uni265C;
sub b b -> uni265D;
sub b n -> uni265E;
sub b p -> uni265F;

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 7:44 am
by Erwin Denissen
Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:How about using GSUB features that are enabled by default (contextual or standard ligatures) to replace rude words with emoticons? :D
In the mean time Pixelambacht (Roel Nieskens) made a font named Sans Bullshit Sans which replaces several popular buzzwords by a Comic Sans-styled censorship bar.
bullshit.png
bullshit.png (85.23 KiB) Viewed 1572 times
https://pixelambacht.nl/2015/sans-bullshit-sans/

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 8:09 am
by Erwin Denissen
While testing the improved outline validation features in FontCreator I recently discovered several undocumented glyphs in Comic Sans. They are added since version 5.11 which came with Windows 8.
comicsans.png
comicsans.png (29.86 KiB) Viewed 1571 times
Maybe the font designer added them with the intention to use them as substitutes, so do let us know if you know the reason why they were added.

For the record, those glyphs mentioned above all passed the most important validation checks (although most contain off-curve extremes), but 7 other glyphs contains contours with an incorrect direction:
comicsansoutlineissues.png
comicsansoutlineissues.png (4.76 KiB) Viewed 1571 times

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 9:18 am
by Bhikkhu Pesala
I found this on Wikipedia

Comic Sans Pro (2011)
Comic Sans Pro is an improved and expanded version created by Terrance Weinzierl from Monotype Imaging. While retaining the original classic design of the core characters, it adds new italic variants of the original fonts, swashes, small capitals, extra ornaments and symbols including speech bubbles, onomatopoeia and dingbats, as well as text figures and other stylistic alternates. Originally appearing as part of Ascender 2010 Font Pack as Comic Sans 2010, it was first released on April Fools' Day, causing some to initially assume it was a joke.

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 12:15 pm
by Alfred
Erwin Denissen wrote:
Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:How about using GSUB features that are enabled by default (contextual or standard ligatures) to replace rude words with emoticons? :D
In the mean time Pixelambacht (Roel Nieskens) made a font named Sans Bullshit Sans which replaces several popular buzzwords by a Comic Sans-styled censorship bar.

bullshit.png
https://pixelambacht.nl/2015/sans-bullshit-sans/
I first read about that font and Apple Sans Adjectives on another forum where the swear filter replaced the word 'bullsh*t' with 'bullpooh'. :lol:

As I mentioned in my post here, older browsers only support standard ligatures, which is presumably why they're used in preference to contextual ligatures for things like this.

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 12:22 pm
by Alfred
Erwin Denissen wrote:While testing the improved outline validation features in FontCreator I recently discovered several undocumented glyphs in Comic Sans. They are added since version 5.11 which came with Windows 8.

comicsans.png

Maybe the font designer added them with the intention to use them as substitutes, so do let us know if you know the reason why they were added.

For the record, those glyphs mentioned above all passed the most important validation checks (although most contain off-curve extremes), but 7 other glyphs contains contours with an incorrect direction:

comicsansoutlineissues.png
It does seem odd that those glyphs are unused. The fact that there are 26 of them suggests that they were intended to be mapped to letters of the alphabet.

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 12:52 pm
by Erwin Denissen
Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:I found this on Wikipedia

Comic Sans Pro (2011)
Comic Sans Pro is an improved and expanded version created by Terrance Weinzierl from Monotype Imaging. While retaining the original classic design of the core characters, it adds new italic variants of the original fonts, swashes, small capitals, extra ornaments and symbols including speech bubbles, onomatopoeia and dingbats, as well as text figures and other stylistic alternates. Originally appearing as part of Ascender 2010 Font Pack as Comic Sans 2010, it was first released on April Fools' Day, causing some to initially assume it was a joke.
Interesting. I still wonder why they included those glyphs, without making them available. I suspect they initially intended to expose them through OpenType features, but later decided to exclude them.
Alfred wrote:
Erwin Denissen wrote:
Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:How about using GSUB features that are enabled by default (contextual or standard ligatures) to replace rude words with emoticons? :D
In the mean time Pixelambacht (Roel Nieskens) made a font named Sans Bullshit Sans which replaces several popular buzzwords by a Comic Sans-styled censorship bar.

bullshit.png
https://pixelambacht.nl/2015/sans-bullshit-sans/
I first read about that font and Apple Sans Adjectives on another forum where the swear filter replaced the word 'bullsh*t' with 'bullpooh'. :lol:

As I mentioned in my post here, older browsers only support standard ligatures, which is presumably why they're used in preference to contextual ligatures for things like this.
This font also contains some glyphs which are not directly available:
AppleSansAdjectives.png
AppleSansAdjectives.png (11.18 KiB) Viewed 1560 times
Also note Sans Bullshit Sans and Apple Sans Adjectives both contains invalid OpenType features, as they have included the same feature (StandardLigatures) twice in the same script/language.

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 1:06 pm
by Dave Crosby
Image
Has anyone located photos of the individuals to compare with the glyph?

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2016 5:19 pm
by Alfred
Erwin Denissen wrote:This font also contains some glyphs which are not directly available:

AppleSansAdjectives.png
Thanks, Erwin. I hadn't spotted those!

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:37 am
by PJMiller
I don't know if this counts as an Easter Egg or not but Kelvinch contains a few symbols that are different between Regular, Bold, Italic and Bold-italic.

It started out when I copied Bhikkhu Pesala's symbol blocks and a few other blocks from his Pali font and then I saw this thread in the forum and thought it was a good idea. So there are a few more altered symbols that few if any people will find.

I also buried a White Rose of Yorkshire symbol in there.

8) Bulleted lists anyone?

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Thu Apr 13, 2017 11:03 pm
by Erwin Denissen
Happy Easter!

And if you happen to find an Easter egg in a font, do let us know!

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 5:01 am
by Bhikkhu Pesala
I have added Irony Punctuation to my fonts, and used Standard Ligatures to replace ?? and ¿¡ with the new glyphs, which might otherwise go unnoticed.
Irony Punctuation.png
Irony Punctuation.png (1.92 KiB) Viewed 994 times

Re: Font Easter Egg

Posted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 7:10 am
by Erwin Denissen
Dave Crosby wrote:
Wed Oct 12, 2016 1:06 pm
Image
Has anyone located photos of the individuals to compare with the glyph?
A recent online article provides more information:
The Faces Of Microsoft
ALL THE TRAVELING was taking its toll on Greg and Eliyezer. At the end of June 1991, they brought the production work from Salfords to Redmond, bringing four Monotype employees with them: Mike Duggan, Geraldine Wade, Ian Patterson, and Sue Lightfoot. “Mike,” says Greg Hitchcock, “was Mr. Pixel. Geraldine focused on maintaining the beauty of the typeface design. Sue could handle all the monotonous projects with precision. Ian was the technical hinting guy.”
the smiggring from left to right:
Geraldine Wade, Sue Lightfoot, Greg Hitchcock, Ian Patterson, and Michael Duggan
GeraldineBanes.png
Geraldine Banes
GeraldineBanes.png (194.99 KiB) Viewed 181 times
GregHitchcock.png
Greg Hitchcock
GregHitchcock.png (253.28 KiB) Viewed 183 times
MikeDuggan.png
Mike Duggan
MikeDuggan.png (244.85 KiB) Viewed 181 times