Seasoned Graphic Designer - Newbie to High Logic

Discuss FontCreator here, please do not post support requests, feature requests, or bug reports!
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Fonterific
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2010 8:46 pm

Seasoned Graphic Designer - Newbie to High Logic

Post by Fonterific » Thu Nov 18, 2010 3:59 pm

How's it going, everyone? I wasn't sure where I should post my introduction, so I thought I'd give it a shot in the Font Creator Discussion area. My name is Olivia and I'm a freelance graphic designer from Indianapolis. Always being on call and busy with projects, I have to figure out new and innovative ways to improve my work. One of the things a friend suggested to me was to create my own fonts. I also have the designs in my head (and on paper), but I needed a program to implement them in -- so this is why I'm here. I'm hoping that by being here, I can learn more about the program, how much it costs and observe other people's fonts for inspiration.

Either way, I'm happy to be here! Take care, everyone!!!

Bhikkhu Pesala
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Re: Seasoned Graphic Designer - Newbie to High Logic

Post by Bhikkhu Pesala » Thu Nov 18, 2010 6:10 pm

If you want to use your fonts professionally you will need to purchase FontCreator Professional. It is well worth the extra for the level of automation it offers. If you're a professional, then you know that time is money. As I am a Buddhist monk, time is not a pressing issue for me, but I still like to automate everything I can, otherwise editing my large Unicode fonts is tedious and error-prone.

How Long Does it Take to Make a Font?

If you're a graphic artist, Scanahand may be much easier to use, but it will leave you frustrated due to the limited control it offers over spacing and editing of fonts. You really need FontCreator. Compared to FontLab it is very inexpensive.

If you already have a large and detailed design on paper, it is a quick process to scan the image and import it into FontCreator. If you have already drawn it in a vector program, importing from PDF or AI vector images is even faster and better.

Actually, one can do a good job with the drawing tools built-in to FontCreator, but some relearning will be required. My usual approach is to import a bitmap as a starting point, then adjust the curves to make them smooth within FontCreator.

The hardest part is getting the spacing and stroke weights even.
My FontsReviews: MainTypeFont CreatorHelpFC12 Pro + MT9.0 @ Win10 1903 build 18362.356

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